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Rainforest-Deforestation

Legislative Action
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            There have been very few successful attempts at creating laws that will stop rainforest destruction. Part of the reason why few of these laws have passed is because the people of the rainforest depend on the cutting down of these trees for farming and major corporations make a lot of money off the cutting down of the rainforest. (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001) There are also not enough personnel or authorities to enforce the laws that currently exist. This was found to be especially true for Brazil. The authorities also have great natural difficulties in reaching some areas of the rainforest.  (<www.2blowhards.com/archives/000859.html> July, 2003)

 

The following are a few laws that were passed:

            In 1973, the Decree law 701 was created by General Pinochet of the Government of Chile. This law encouraged woodland management and replanting of woodland. “It led to the incorporation of 2.8 million hectares into the woodland system.”(<www.american.edu/TED/chile.htm> 1996) The only problem with having so much of the woodlands replanted was that it attracted more companies to want to come in and harvest the trees. (<www.american.edu/TED/chile.htm> 1996)

            The following legislative action is an act not a law, but helps to combat deforestation. The International Forestry Cooperation Act of 1990 allows the Environmental Careers Organization to work overseas and provide financial and technical assistance to help other research in fight against deforestation and other causes. (<www.eco.org/Guide/Chap14/history.html> 2003)

                        Government action needs to take place before the rainforest is damaged beyond repair. The following are some steps that the government might take in order to help the rainforest.

  1. “Halt the uncontrolled burning of rainforest land to provide land for cultivation. Provide good farmlands by way of land reform.” (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001)
  2. “Halt the felling of timber for fuel. Provide acceptable substitutes.” (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001)
  3. “Halt the commercial logging of old growth forests. Co-develop (with local communities) ecologized tree farms (using ecological values, science, and practices) on degraded land.” (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001)
  4. “Halt the large scale conversion of forests for agricultural uses.” (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001)
  5. “Halt the extraction and processing of mineral resources. Develop closed-loop resource recovery systems. (In a closed-loop system, no waste goes unused. All materials are remanufactured into useful products.)” (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001)
  6. “Halt large hydroelectric projects. Promote solar and wind energy and energy efficiency.” (<www.rainforestweb.org/Rainforest Destruction/Government Policy/?state=more> 2001)

 

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This website is here to inform the public

about the devastating affects of rainforest-deforestation.